Andrew Odlyzko

Andrew Odlyzko is a Professor in the School of Mathematics at the University of Minnesota. He is engaged in a variety of projects, from mathematics to security and Internet traffic monitoring. His main task currently is to write a book that compares the Internet bubble to the British Railway Mania of the 1840s, and explores the implications for future of technology diffusion.

Between 2001 and 2008, he also was at various times the founding director of the interdisciplinary Digital Technology Center, Interim Director of the Minnesota Supercomputing Institute, Assistant Vice President for Research, and held an ADC Professorship, all at the University of Minnesota. Before moving to Minneapolis in 2001, he devoted 26 years to research and research management at Bell Telephone Laboratories, AT&T Bell Labs, and AT&T Labs, as that organization evolved and changed its name.

He has written over 150 technical papers in computational complexity, cryptography, number theory, combinatorics, coding theory, analysis, probability theory, and related fields, and has three patents. He has an honorary doctorate from Univ. Marne la Vallee and serves on editorial boards of over 20 technical journals, as well as on several advisory and supervisory bodies.

He has managed projects in diverse areas, such as security, formal verification methods, parallel and distributed computation, and auction technology. In recent years he has also been working on electronic publishing, electronic commerce, and economics of data networks, and is the author of such widely cited papers as "Tragic loss or good riddance: The impending demise of traditional scholarly journals," "The bumpy road of electronic commerce," "Paris Metro Pricing for the Internet," "Content is not king," and "The history of communications and its implications for the Internet." He may be known best for an early debunking of the myth of Internet traffic doubling every three or four months and for demonstrating that connectivity has traditionally mattered much more for society than content.

Andrew Odlyzko's email address is odlyzko@umn.edu, and all his recent papers as well as further information can be found on his home page.


Nicholas Economides

Nicholas Economides is an internationally recognized academic authority on network economics, electronic commerce and public policy. His fields of specialization and research include the economics of networks, especially of telecommunications, computers, and information, the economics of technical compatibility and standardization, industrial organization, the structure and organization of financial markets and payment systems, antitrust, application of public policy to network industries, strategic analysis of markets and law and economics.

Professor Economides has published more than 100 articles in top academic journals in the areas of networks, telecommunications, oligopoly, antitrust, product positioning and on the liquidity and the organization of financial markets and exchanges. He holds a Ph.D. and M.A. in Economics from the University of California at Berkeley, as well as a B.Sc. (First Class Honors) in Mathematical Economics from the London School of Economics. Previously, he taught at Columbia University (1981-1988) and at Stanford University (1988-1990). He is editor of the Information Economics and Policy, Netnomics, Quarterly Journal of Electronic Commerce, the Journal of Financial Transformation, Journal of Network Industries, on the Advisory Board of the Social Science Research Network, editor of Economics of Networks Abstracts by SSRN and former editor of the International Journal of Industrial Organization. His website on the Economics of Networks has been ranked as one of the top four economics sites worldwide by The Economist magazine.

Professor Economides is Executive Director of the NET Institute, http://www.NETinst.org, a worldwide focal point for research on the economics of network and high technology industries. He is advisor to the US Federal Trade Commission, the governments of Greece, Ireland, New Zealand and Portugal, the Attorney General of New York State, major telecommunications corporations, a number of the Federal Reserve Banks, the Bank of Greece and major Financial Exchanges. He serves on the Advisory Board of the Economist Intelligence Unit. He has commented extensively in broadcast and in print on high technology, antitrust and public policy issues. A complete CV is available at http://www.stern.nyu.edu/networks/cvnoref.html.


Roch Guerin

Roch Guérin received an engineer degree from ENST, Paris, France, and M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in Electrical Engineering from Caltech. He joined the Electrical and System Engineering department of the University of Pennsylvania in 1998 as the Alfred Fitler Moore Professor of Telecommunications Networks. Prior to joining Penn, he spent many years at the IBM T. J. Watson Research Center in a variety of technical and management positions. From 2001 to 2004 he was on leave from Penn, starting Ipsum Networks, a company that pioneered the concept of route analytics for managing IP networks.

Dr. Guérin has published extensively in international journals and conferences, and holds more than 30 patents. He has also been active in standard organizations such as the IETF where he has co-authored a number of RFCs. His research is in the general area of networked systems and applications, from wired and wireless networks to social networks, and encompasses both technical and "economic" factors that affect network evolution. Dr. Guérin has been an editor for several ACM and IEEE publications and in 2009 became the Editor-in-Chief of the IEEE/ACM Transactions on Networking. He also served as General Chair or Program co-Chair for a number of ACM and IEEE sponsored conferences. Dr. Guérin is an ACM (2006) and IEEE (2001) Fellow. In 1994 he received an IBM Outstanding Innovation Award for his work on traffic management. He received the IEEE TCCC Outstanding Service Award in 2009, and was the recipient of the 2010 INFOCOM Achievement Award for "Pioneering Contributions to the Theory and Practice of QoS in Networks." He was also the co-recipient of the 2010 INFOCOM Best Paper Award for the paper entitled "On the Feasibility and Efficacy of Protection Routing in IP Networks." He was on the Technical Advisory Board of France Telecom for two consecutive terms from 2001 till 2006 and on the Technical Advisory Board of Samsung Electronics in 2003-2004. He joined the Scientific Advisory Board of Simula Research in 2010, and the Scientific Advisory Board of SITI (University Lusofona) in 2012.